Saturday, 24 July 2010

Thoughts on reading: The Bluest Eye

I discovered I could edit on the train so I wasn't reading for a while. I've got as far as I can with editing the current work-in-progress; it now needs more writing and I can't do that on the train quite so well. That does mean I'm reading again which is no bad thing as active reading leads to better writing.

The Bluest Eye is Toni Morrison's first novel. I wanted to read it as it deals with the impact of cultural conceptions on beauty on people who don't, and can't ever, be beautiful on those narrow terms. And Toni Morrison is an important writer whose work I haven't before read.

In the introduction to the edition of The Bluest Eye that I had, Morrison talked about what she had tried to achieve and how she felt that she'd failed. She'd tried to tell the story of a person who is smashed by rejection, who had no self from which to speak because she had internalised the dismissal and hate. To do this, she used a variety of voices to relate a number of incidents that build up to a picture of the child that results. Morrison doesn't feel she succeeded. As I don't know what she was trying to do, I can't say, but it seems to me that what she wrote was exceptional.

What I particularly took from this novel was the way in which Morrison manages to convey accent and rhythm of speaking with word choice and sentence structure. She doesn't rely on dialect spellings to give her characters authentic voices, meaning the reader doesn't need to work out how things are supposed to sound. She uses words that were contemporary to 1950's Black America and structures her sentences in ways that mimic the rhythm of this type of speech. She allows the world of the novel to be built up quickly without distracting the reader from the story.

The second learning point for me was around structure. The novel has four sections which correspond to the seasons and in each section a part of the story is told by a number of different characters. It isn't chronological for the seasons aren't necessarily in the same year. Each event adds another layer to the story of the life of a child until you see just how brutalised she is, and just how unintentional most of it was.

In her introduction, Morrison says that few people were moved by The Bluest Eye - I certainly was.

2 comments:

Baya said...

What a very interestong comment on the book. I loved the idea of the four seasons structure that does not need to be chronological and will order the book from my library forthwith! Thanks! Baya

Victoria Snelling said...

I think you'll enjoy it!